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Homemade Gluten-Free Eggos

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We here at Food Allergies on Ice have a disagreement.  Yes, it’s true.  That conundrum that sweeps the nation has not overlooked even small-time bloggers.  In my professional development venues, I’ve heard rumblings about the divisive nature of this very serious issue.

Waffles

Waffles (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Pancakes or Waffles?

Belle loves her pancakes.  She has learned how to appease the Pancake Gods, she has written about the glories of stocking your freezer with pancakes, and she has even graciously given to us her treasured Pancake Recipe.  She swears by pancakes.

I like waffles.  They are easy to mix up, give me a chance to multitask and freeze well.  I make my waffles 4 at a time. Infinitely practical! I can turn them into ice cream cones, make them into “faffles” (waffle sandwich), cook the sweetness into them cut into sticks and have snacks for my toddler. Cooks up easier than pancakes on a busy morning. 4 cups of batter has me working on waffles for maybe 20 minutes. 4 cups of pancake batter has me tied to the stove-top for an hour.

My recipe for waffles is simple.  Unfortunately, it is not egg free.  In fact, I put extra eggs in for extra protein staying power for my kids.  Perhaps this is the dividing line between my sister and I…

Gluten-Free Waffles

  • 4 eggs (beaten)
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 3/4 cup water, milk, or juice (be sure to reduce sugar, if you use juice)
  • 2 cups gluten-free flour (or use my Happy Accident Discovery
    )
  • 1 T sugar
  • 1 T baking powder
  • 1/2 t salt
  1. Preheat waffle iron – cold irons are messy and don’t cook waffles!
  2. In small mixing bowl, mix wet ingredients
  3. Add dry ingredients and stir until fully mixed
  4. Pour batter on to a hot waffle iron.  I use about 1/2 cup of batter for a 4-waffle iron.
  5. Cook for about 3 minutes.
    (Know your iron!  Some irons don’t get as hot as others.  This recipe is pretty forgiving and it takes walking away and actually forgetting about the waffles entirely to burn them. Not that I’ve done that or anything…)
  6. Serve with your favorite toppings!

Which do you prefer? Pancakes or waffles?  Do you have a favorite topping or a unique way to use waffles?  Let us know!

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Tuesday Tips – The Happy Accident Discovery

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#3 Flour & friends

#3 Flour & friends (Photo credit: mrlins)

I’ve had an interesting year, this year.  Major life changes, moving across the country and all that jazz.  At one point we were trying our best to live off what was left in the pantry, trying to make our food dollars stretch as far as they would.  I had heard of people using bean flour as a substitute in baking so I decided to experiment.

I didn’t have bean flour, but I did have dry beans.  I didn’t have a flour grinder, but I did have a blender.  I knew what consistency I was looking for in bread batter or for tortillas, and can easily reduce liquids.  So I soaked my beans, cooked them, and blended them to a puree.  My first experiment was in tortillas, and as my sister mentioned, they were flexible but gummy.  More experimentation was needed.  If you’re looking for flexible gluten free tortillas look here.

I continued my experimentation with bread and waffles.  I have discovered that with the new flour mix I could replace 1/4 of the flour in a recipe with pureed beans to achieve an amazing moist crumb without being too crumbly, and plenty of flexibility.  I also noticed that the bread had better rise with the added protein.

Along with the better texture, I love the added vitamins, minerals and protein that the beans give my baked goods.  My children seem to find the new addition more filling, and they do rave about the taste of the food (and they are pretty picky eaters!) so I am confident that this is a Happy Accident we will continue to use in our kitchen!

Anyone else have a Happy Accident to share?

Friday’s Fab or Fail: More About Xylitol Candy…

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I’m a big fan of doing things once and doing it big enough that I don’t have to think about it for a while.  You know, kind of the point of this blog.  So, I had the bright idea this summer to expand my candy making to a bulk sized endeavor.  The small batches were a big hit, but time intensive.  I don’t have tons of spare time to be standing around in my kitchen watching sugar boil (as I’m sure many of you can relate to!) so bulk is the way to go.

Home-made Xylitol CandyThe original recipe was 1 cup of water and 1 cup of xylitol.  Bring to a hard boil for 12 minutes (or 310*F) and tada! Candy!  That seemed to work well for the small batches.  There were always some candies that didn’t harden, and some of them turned out a bit crumbly, but no one really cared much.  So, I increased my recipe by 4.

Well, let’s just say that this plan didn’t really come together how I envisioned it.  First of all, it took f.o.r.e.v.e.r. for the xylitol to come to the right temperature.  Then, I discovered that you don’t add flavoring to candy when it is at temperature. Bad idea!!!  The difference in temperatures cause the intended mix to spatter and it can burn you!  DON’T DO IT!  Don’t worry – I’ll tell you the safe way to do this in a minute. The third issue that occurred with my bulk attempt is that some candies hardened beautifully, some never hardened, and some were like crystal shards – not really what one expects when one thinks of HARD candy…  It was quite mysterious, and obviously needed more thought.

I started playing around with the xylitol candy recipe (as I do, when things don’t turn out just how I want them) and have discovered that the original recipe I linked to isn’t the best way to make it. The original recipe used xylitol and water, and then boiled off the water to make the candies. After much research, also known as reading candy cookbooks (yum!), I decided to skip the water as an ingredient altogether.  As it turns out the wide variety of textures in my bulk candy experiment were because of the various amounts of water in the solution.  The really crumbly candies were poured first, and the hard candies were poured at the end when the water had finally boiled off.

So, to make your xylitol candy, you will need to slowly melt some xylitol in a small pan. In this case slow is better – so you don’t burn the xylitol before it melts.  When the temperature reaches “hard crack” (which is about 310*, or if you drip some into cold water, it forms threads that will crack when you try to mold them) pour the xylitol into your candy mold, or drip it onto parchment paper and let it harden.

As I said earlier, DON’T add the flavoring when the candy mixture is at its hottest – it will spatter and burn you! Wait for the xylitol to cool some (to about 270* or so) before adding the flavoring. You will still have plenty of time to take advantage of the fluidity of your candy before it hardens.

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